NNPBC Blog


DTES

Standing Together in a Time of Uncertainty

Standing Together in a Time of Uncertainty by Tania Dick, RN, MN My first President’s update comes at a time when our province is in a great deal of turmoil, which makes sitting down to gather my thoughts, emotions, and reflections a struggle - my nursing self wants to constantly be doing something to help. As nurses we need to almost be a CTAS 1 before we’re still, which is… Read More »Standing Together in a Time of Uncertainty

Healthy Baby Feeding Initiative for Vulnerable Populations

Healthy Baby Feeding Initiative for Vulnerable Populations by Shauna Mc Goldrick and Viktorija Glambinskaite, BSN Students As nursing students with a passion for public health and health promotion, we were incredibly fortunate to work with Sheway during our public health promotion clinical placement at Vancouver Community College. Sheway is a Pregnancy Outreach Program located in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver (DTES) that provides health and social service supports to pregnant… Read More »Healthy Baby Feeding Initiative for Vulnerable Populations

The Opioid Crisis Can’t Be Just a Headline for the Nursing Profession

Please note, this post originally appeared on the ARNBC Blog in December 2016. It is shared with permission.  The Opioid Crisis Can't Be Just a Headline for the Nursing Profession by Zak Matieschyn, BSN, MN, RN, NP(Family) I've had some great experiences during my year and a half as ARNBC president, but one will stand out for me long after my presidency ends. This week, I and a group of… Read More »The Opioid Crisis Can’t Be Just a Headline for the Nursing Profession

Overdose Deaths in B.C. - Time to Scale up Supervised Consumption Services, by Dr. Bernie Pauly, RN

In the first six months of this year, 371 British Columbians died due to an overdose. This is a 74.2% increase from the previous year. Almost one quarter of these deaths are people in their 20s, 30s and 40s. Fentanyl, a powerful synthetic opiod was detected alone or in combination with other drugs in up to 60% of overdose deaths. Frequently, people consume Fentanyl unknowingly. Overdose deaths are now the… Read More »Overdose Deaths in B.C. - Time to Scale up Supervised Consumption Services, by Dr. Bernie Pauly, RN

The role of street nurses in increasing access to health care for marginalized populations

  • by

Please note, this post originally appeared on the ARNBC Blog in June 2016. It is shared with permission.  The role of street nurses in increasing access to health care for marginalized populations By Meaghan Thumath, RN, BScN, MSc PH The downtown eastside is a fascinating place to practice nursing with a rich history, diverse population and artistic flair. It is also a place where many people struggle daily without adequate… Read More »The role of street nurses in increasing access to health care for marginalized populations

Making a Difference for those with Mental Illness, by Scott Harrison RN

The events of the past week in Newtown, Connecticut are almost beyond comprehension.  Whilst the media attempt to help the public ‘make sense’ of a senseless tragedy, social media sites are alive with debate on who is to blame, how further tragedy can be avoided and questions about what happens next. As a Registered Nurse who has worked with marginalized populations for my (to date) 20 year career in nursing,… Read More »Making a Difference for those with Mental Illness, by Scott Harrison RN

What Did It Take to Get Insite? by Irene Goldstone

Insite is the only legal supervised injection site in North America, located in the Downtown Eastside neighbourhood of Vancouver.  After a lengthy legal struggle, on September 30, 2011 the Supreme Court of Canada unanimously ruled that Insite should immediately be granted an exemption under the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) and remain open (http://scc.lexum.org/en/2011/2011scc44/2011scc44.html). The ruling stated that closing Insite would prevent injection drug users from accessing needed health services… Read More »What Did It Take to Get Insite? by Irene Goldstone